Thursday, May 03, 2007

Fiql Revisited

I haven't talked about Fiql in a while, and thought it was time. For those that have never checked it out, I highly recommend it. To over simplify, think of it as a place where playlists go to mingle, find their mates, and make babies.

Upload a playlist (data not the assets) from your media player, write a description (make it good if you want to get it called out as a "Fiql Pick"), categorize it, and submit. Fiql will then do the work to match the playlist (or as much of it as it can) to both Napster and Rhapsody. Combine that with Napster's 3-free-plays-per-song trial methodology and now you have a playlist that anyone can listen to (at least 3 times). If you are a Rhapsody subscriber, then you can seamlessly listen to playlists from Fiql - or easily export your playlists from Rhapsody into Fiql. Last.fm user? Then leverage Last.fm's webservices to download an XSPF playlist of your Top 50 Played tracks (http://ws.audioscrobbler.com/1.0/user/jherskowitz/toptracks.xspf) to your desktop. Turn around and upload the XSPF file to Fiql, and done. MyStrands user? Even easier, just find a playlist and click "download xspf".

One of the newer additions is that you can also add MP3 URLs for every track in your playlist (click the "link" icon next to the first song and it will run through the MP3s). I created one, check it out:



The beauty of it.... it is completely legal. The artists get paid, the playlisters won't get sued, Fiql makes money from bounties and advertising, and the consumers benefit from a service that acts as a translation layer between playlists - it is media player and media source agnostic. I actually uploaded my Music Now playlists (from Windows Media Player) so I didn't have to go and recreate them in Napster and Rhapsody.

There are lots of other nice (and very slickly designed) features as well... blogs, groups, forums, community/unsigned artist pages, and more.

I have a feeling there is more from where all this came from....

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